Prayer Of One Who Serves As A Member Of The Police

By Bishop Joseph N. Perry

O good Lord, I know well that thou art all perfect and are in need of nothing.  Yet, I know that thou hast taken upon thyself the nature of man and, not only so, but in that nature didst come upon this earth and suffer all manner of evil and didst die for our sake.  This is sacred history which has spilled from the heavens with light and glory and great promise for all who believe in thee.

O dear Lord, thou didst suffer in no ordinary way but unheard of and extreme torments.  Indeed your agony still cries from the streets where we labor.  This is the truth of the Gospel which has shaped my vision and my hope for all that is meaningful to me.  You are the one foundation, Jesus Christ crucified.  I know it O Lord, I believe it and I place this faith steadily before my eyes and heart.

And, here I am, a member of the police force, sworn to serve and protect the citizens of our city and in so doing bound to meet up with the two glaring portraits of life, sin and evil, goodness and virtue that collide on the streets of the living.  I cannot do this task alone.  All I know is that I am in sore need of your guidance and direction that I may judge wisely and discern truthfully; that especially in times of danger I may offer my life to you and for others and that in face of genuine encounters with the virtue of citizens I may praise them and be for them myself a symbol of honor and justice. 

I left home this day to serve thee and thy people.  I pray you bring me back home safely with my family and loved ones, only to again serve as I am want to do this day and every day. In all things honoring you as the Lord of my life, AMEN

Bishop Joseph N Perry – Archdiocese of Chicago – 2020

Manhood Monday: We Are Called to be Evangelizers!

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Alleluia  Lk 7:16

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
A great prophet has arisen in our midst
and God has visited his people.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

How few of us have seen or heard a call from God, a divine vocation, in the humdrum activities of our daily lives, and yet these ordinary daily tasks are the road to heaven that God has mapped out for us. These are the “vocations” he has given us.

We may say that we ourselves chose our careers in life, we decided what occupation we should follow, but behind our free decisions the wise providence of God, working through parents, neighbors, circumstances of time and place, has so arranged our earthly journey that it would end for us in heaven.

Many of us grumble at our role in life. We think our lot is so inferior and demanding when compared with the life others lead, and even go so far as to say that God could have no part in such a bad arrangement.

Yet, God is in charge of his world. He chooses each individual for the role he is to carry to its successful conclusion. And let’s not forget that although we may have responded to God’s call to our specific “vocation” in life, above all we are called to be Holy. We are called to be Evangelizers! 

~ Deacon John Rangel

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

The late Francis Cardinal George, Archbishop of Chicago from 1997 to 2014, talks with a child while visiting a Chicago parish for Mass, circa. 2008.

“The only thing we take with us when we die, is what we have given away”

Francis Cardinal George

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


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Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter each year. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and beyond are invited to attend.

Bishop Joseph Perry: The Relevance of Church

Is it too late to save our families and ourselves for God?

It is not easy proclaiming the Gospel in a secularized world – a world that is of diminished religious tone.

In a recent address, December 21, to the Cardinals and staffs of the Roman Curia at the Vatican, Pope Francis recalled that we are no longer living in a Christian world. 

“Christendom no longer exists. Today, we are no longer the only ones who create culture, nor are we in the forefront or those most listened to … we are no longer living in a Christian world, because faith… is no longer an evident presupposition of social life; indeed, faith is often rejected, derided, marginalized and ridiculed… the faith used to be passed on within families and the example of parents; society too was inspired by Christian principles. Today, this transmission has been interrupted and our social context, if not anti-Christian, appears to be at least impermeable to the Christian faith.  Hence the question … how to proclaim the Gospel where it is no longer known or recognized?  It is pointless getting agitated. There is no need to get organized, or to make a noise. There’s no need for gimmicks or stratagems. In the mission of proclaiming the Gospel, you move because the Holy Spirit pushes you, and carries you.  And when you arrive you realize that He has come before you and is waiting for you.”

“Proclaiming the Gospel,” adds the Pope, “does not consist in besieging others with apologetic speeches … in shouting in peoples’ faces.  Even less is it necessary to fling the truths and doctrinal formulas on others as if they were stones … if people to whom it is addressed have no opportunity to meet and taste in some way God’s tenderness and His healing mercy… to facilitate, that is, make it easy not to put us in the way of Jesus’ desire to embrace everyone, to heal everyone, to save everyone.”  Always aware that without Him we can do nothing.

With these thoughts of the Holy Father in mind, is it too late to save our families and ourselves for God?  How about the evangelization of our households, our friendships.  How about fervent practice of our faith for these times and every time.  How about we men being intentional pastors of our households leading the way?

Bishop Joseph Perry

Manhood Monday: The Authority of Jesus

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Third Week of Advent

Alleluia  PS 85:8

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Show us, LORD, your love,
and grant us your salvation.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

From today’s Gospel in Matthew [21:27], since through embarrassment on the one hand and fear on the other the religious authorities claim ignorance of the origin of John’s baptism, they show themselves incapable of speaking with authority; hence Jesus refuses to discuss with them the grounds of his authority.

As Catholic men, how important is it for us to respect authority?  What type of leadership do we have with others, in the community, at work, with our family?  In order for us to expect authority, we have to first respect others authority.

Jesus commands authority because he is submissive to the will of the Father, and thus his holiness is magnetic.  He is not on his own agenda.  For example, if you work for a company and practice your own authority, usually you won’t work there very long. Likewise, with your family, if you are a dictator instead of a servant leader, then you show yourself incapable of respecting authority.

One purpose of Advent is to bring us back to God, and to foster renewal for the mission of our salvation through the Christ Child. Because when men put God first all else falls into place.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘When Men Put God First‘ Copyright Frank J Casella. Prints | Cards

“See, our vision is very clear. Really, one of the biggest challenges we have, as an apostolate, has been casting this vision and trusting God that it would land with church leaders — that when you nurture Catholic Men’s spirituality, and foster men in holiness, everybody wins

…… there are others who are going to benefit.

For CMCS, we know that when you foster a Man in holiness, the positive adjustments he makes can create a upstanding man, husband, or father, and this impact can be felt for three generations

…. and everybody wins.”

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.

Not signed up to the blog yet? Click here.

Manhood Monday: The Women Among Us

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Alleluia  See Lk 1:28

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Hail, Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with you;
blessed are you among women.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

In the Gospel reading for today, [1:3637] The sign given to Mary in confirmation of the angel’s announcement to her is the pregnancy of her aged relative Elizabeth. If a woman past the childbearing age could become pregnant, why, the angel implies, should there be doubt about Mary’s pregnancy, for nothing will be impossible for God.

Mary’s womb is known by the Church as the First Tabernacle, for her saying ‘Yes” and believing in the impossible. God needed a woman first to bring His plan of salvation into the world.  

This is why us men should place our own mothers and wives and daughters in the rightful place of honor and respect, and pray the Lord be with them and bless them among women.  Do you think this would bring a new light or perspective in your relationships with them?

The best way to make your spouse and children feel secure is not with big deposits in bank account, but with little deposits of thoughtfulness and affection in the ‘love account’.

Zig Ziglar

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘True Prosperity’ Copyright 2011 Frank J Casella

True Prosperity

When we walk in the way that we should go, and treat others the way we would like to be treated, we find true prosperity.

Those who follow you, Lord, will have the light of life.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.

Not signed up yet? Click here.

Strength in Unity

Small groups for men.

In the second Story of Creation (Gn 2:18) The Lord God said: “It is not good for man to be alone. I will make a suitable partner for him”. From the beginning God created man with an inherent desire for human contact, a need for human interaction and relationships.

Scripture contains many passages that cite man’s need for relationships and the positive benefits that accrue therefrom.

“As iron sharpens iron, so man sharpens his fellow man.” (Proverbs 27:17)

“Two are better than one, because they have a good return for their work: If one falls down, his friend can help him up. But pity the man who falls and has no one to help him up.” (Ecclesiastes 4:9-10)

Man is a relational creature. It has been empirically demonstrated through study after study that when man is deprived of human contact he suffers emotional, physical and spiritual harm to his well-being. We know also that men fulfill their human relational needs in different ways than women.

We men tend to be less willing to share emotions and feelings in personal relationships, jealously guarding our vulnerability or perhaps not wishing to signal a position of “weakness”. Not withstanding our guarded actions, we men need to participant in meaningful personal relationships in order to grow and be fully human.

A cornerstone of CMCS’ ministry is to encourage men to develop men’s small groups within their local parishes. Why small groups? Well for one, Jesus himself provided the model when he called a small band of twelve men to be his disciples. Was this a randomly selected number? I don’t think so.

I believe Jesus knew that the unity, strength and discipline required of his initial followers would best be accomplished if they had an intimate personal relationship with him and each other. The rest is history!

Why are small Catholic men’s groups so valuable to the men participating, as well as to the local parish? Here’s what some men have to say (Book Source: Small Christian Communities: A Vision of Hope.)…

“Jesus showed us that a radically new relationship is possible between God and humans and among human beings. It is a relationship of integrity, wholeness, and freedom from fear and anxiety. It is a relationship of justice and peace. It is the coming of the reign of God.”

St. Pope John Paul II said …”small faith communities are a sign of vitality within the church, an instrument of formation and evangelization, and a solid starting point for a new society based on a civilization of love.”

Lastly, Small Men’s Groups are a readily available and easy to implement tool to help us live out the eight virtues of a Catholic man offered to us by our Vicar Bishop Joseph Perry.

Deacon John Rangel, CMCS Co-Founder and Director of Mission

Manhood Monday: Preparing for Salvation

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Alleluia  SEE PS 80:4

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Come and save us, LORD our God;
let your face shine upon us, that we may be saved.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

In today’s Gospel it reads: “Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof;
only say the word and my servant will be healed.”

We pray this prayer every time that we worship at Mass. It is a prayer of faith and trust in the Lord.

When we let people under our roof, or into our home, they come to know more of who we are. How much more, then, Jesus Christ!  What religious subjects do you have in your home that tells of who you are?

Likewise, inviting the Lord under our roof could mean also to open up to Him our own lives. A way that our lives can be a work in progress, as men, is to humble ourselves to receive the Lord’s blessings that we may be saved.

This Advent, allow God’s vision of peace to inspire you: be vigilant and attentive, and be prepared.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Click to view in detail or to purchase
Photo: ‘Let There Be Peace On Earth‘ Copyright Frank J Casella Prints | Cards

This war torn world needs healing.

More personal, though, under our own roof we all need healing of some kind.

I have found that when we look to the Lord for the healing of others, somehow it affects our own healing.

A simple prayer:

Come and save us, LORD our God;

Let your face shine upon us, that we may be saved.

Let there be peace on earth. Let it begin with me.

PS 80:4

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.

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