Manhood Monday: The LORD Will Be With You

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Fourth Week of Lent

Verse Before the Gospel  Am 5:14

Seek good and not evil so that you may live,
and the LORD will be with you.

“Indeed, nothing is worthwhile unless we do it intentionally and with fervor as upright Christians.  This is the manner in which Jesus lived and died for us.  It is the only way his disciples can live authentically his legacy.”

Bishop Joseph N. Perry from ‘Taking Life Seriously’

God bless your week.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘Family Walk to the Park’ Coyright 2016 Frank J Casella on Fine Art America

Daily Video Reflection for March 23, 2020 from the U.S. Catholic Bishops

For the Daily Readings, plus audio and video, please visit http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: Hope in the Lord

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Third Week of Lent

Verse Before The Gospel PS 130:5, 7

I hope in the LORD, I trust in his word;
with him there is kindness and plenteous redemption.

Even now and as we grow older, our faith can grow through our experiences, especially if we can tune in and recognize those moments either as they happen or when we look back on them. Many times, those moments can feel like interruptions as they occur. But when we look back we may realize they were moments of grace.

Most of us inherited our faith.  It was bequeathed to us by previous generations.  We were brought to the baptismal font as infants.  We grew up in the church. We were tutored in the basic truths of the faith.  We were fortunate if we saw those truths exemplified in our families.  Loving parents, fellow Christians, clergy and other model adults made the idea of a loving God believable.  The necessity of sharing with our brothers and sisters – siblings – planted in us the seeds of generosity and sharing.  Receiving fair treatment along life’s way helped us to learn to trust.  By being forgiven we learned to forgive others while learning that we are loved by God despite our mistakes.  In other words, Christian faith was a part of our development.  It was natural to become a follower of Jesus Christ. We cannot remember when Christianity was not a part of our lives.

Bishop Joseph Perry: ‘Come and See’

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo” ‘Prayer Offerings’ Copyright 2016 Frank J Casella on Fine Art America

Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, has issued the following regarding Coronavirus (COVID-19):

“With the worldwide outbreak of the coronavirus, we are confronted once more with the fragility of our lives, and again we are reminded of our common humanity — that the peoples of this world are our brothers and sisters, that we are all one family under God.

God does not abandon us, he goes with us even now in this time of trial and testing. In this moment, it is important for us to anchor our hearts in the hope that we have in Jesus Christ. Now is the time to intensify our prayers and sacrifices for the love of God and the love of our neighbor. Let us draw closer to one another in our love for him, and rediscover the things that truly matter in our lives.

United with our Holy Father Pope Francis, let us pray in solidarity for our brothers and sisters here and around the world who are sick. Let us pray for those who have lost loved ones to this virus. May God console them and grant them peace.

We pray also for doctors, nurses, and caregivers, for public health officials and all civic leaders. May God grant them courage and prudence as they seek to respond to this emergency with compassion and in service to the common good.

In this time of need, I invite all the faithful to seek together the maternal intercession of Our Lady of Guadalupe, and I share this prayer with you (PDF).”

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: The Words of Eternal Life

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Second Week in Lent.

Verse Before the Gospe l Jn 6:63c, 68c

Your words, Lord, are Spirit and life;
you have the words of everlasting life.

Spirit and life: all Jesus said about the bread of life is the revelation of the Spirit.

Needing to go to Confession is like needing to check in with a doctor regarding our physical health.  We cannot afford to neglect spiritual doctoring of our souls any more than we can afford to neglect a physical doctor of our bodies.  The Sacrament of Penance also works for a healthy life.  Mature and healthy men are men who can take themselves to task, recognize their mistakes and take aim to correct those mistakes for the sake of positive connections with their spouse, their children, their friends, the people they work with and, therefore our God.

Check your parish confession schedule or some parish, shrine or oratory that has a regular confession schedule.

Bishop Joseph Perry: ‘Haven’t Been To Confession In A While?’

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘Swing’ by Frank J Casella on Fine Art America
The Playground of Life

I’m sure you’ve heard it said that the world is our playground? Though, I’ve noticed that many times we can learn from a playground about how to live in the world.

One day as I was taking the dog for a walk by a playground, I couldn’t help but notice a young brother and sister being corrected by their parent about sharing a swing.

The older child said somthing to tease the younger, causing the younger to slug the older. The parent corrected the younger about making a bad decision, yet didn’t correct the older, and then asking the two to appologize to each other.

This incident made me wonder how these two children will behave when they grow up, and what the world would be like without forgiveness.

Then the answer came to just look around us. How many people do you know who’ve shared their life experiences about others, where there wouln’nt be an issue if they’d just say “I’m Sorry” and forgive?

So, it seems that saying “I’m sorry” is a key to making life easier as we play in the playground of life.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: The Day of Salvation

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the First Week of Lent

Verse Before The Gospel 2 COR 6:2B

Behold, now is a very acceptable time;
behold, now is the day of salvation.

“People make the decision easily to attend a football or soccer game rather than attend Sunday Mass. People do this and sleep comfortably the same night thinking they can get up the next morning by their own strength. The sweep of the popular culture out there to live life with little or no reference to God or the Church is immensely attractive. It is an undertow that carries men and their families away from the grace of the Gospel and the sacraments. …

Are you interested in saving your wife and your family?

Are you interested in your own salvation?

I know a man who insists that every Sunday evening his family sits down and has dinner together. Nothing, absolutely nothing can interfere with that family-time. The teenagers in the family are welcome to bring a friend to dinner, but everything else must give way to the family being together at table for once in the course of a week. The chaotic schedules that bear down upon each of the family members makes coming together next to impossible on other days of the week. But this husband and father considers the Sabbath sacred for his family and underscores each one’s participation.

~ Bishop Joseph Perry

God bless your week.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘Pure Beauty‘ by Frank J Casella
Impatience

In our fast paced world of instant gratification and information at our fingertips it’s easy to have impatience.

Impatience is often times associated with anger. We can never make peace with our anger. Anger is caused by hurts and fears in our lives, and when things are not going our way.

On the other hand, when we focus on others and enjoy the beauty of the simple moments, and love people where they are, we see our purpose in life and have more peace.

Likewise, I have learned to have an eternal outlook in life. When we live for eternity we live for others.

If you are a prayerful person, it is important to rest in the Lord for direction. Sometimes the wait may cause impatience, because of not feeling close to God.

When we focus on Jesus, the Father will reveal His presence when we stop looking at self. This is the secret.

God works with us how He wants to work with us — don’t tell him how to do that — it will often happen as a complete surprise as we surrender our will to Him.

All that is not given is lost. It is through our giving that we are blessed, and our impatience for this world goes away.

The only thing we take with us when we die, is what we have given away.

Francis Cardinal George

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter, as well as the Lenten macthing gift appeal. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: Living the Christian Lifestyle

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time

Alleluia  2 Tm 1:10

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Our Savior Jesus Christ has destroyed death
and brought life to light through the Gospel.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

[1:910] Redemption from sin and the call to holiness of life are not won by personal deeds but are freely and graciously bestowed according to God’s eternal plan.

“If we are going to walk with God and become good Christians we need an inner strength which seems to come from a combination of grace and discipline. This strength is not something we can attain for ourselves; it is a gift God freely gives us when we cooperate with His plan for our lives. When we have this strength within us we will have a Christian effect on our families and other acquaintances. When we don’t have this strength, then the environment has an effect on us. So true is that saying, “If you don’t stand for something, you will fall for anything!””

~ Bishop Joseph Perry

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Are you a holy man?

Catholic Men Chicago Southland is about growing in holiness. No matter if it’s our personal life our our business life, when you grow in holiness the most basic benefits are ethics and integrity. Because when you get the persons right, then you get the life right.

Virtues of a Catholic Man

  • A Catholic man has some sense of what or whom he would die for if necessary.
  • A Catholic man passes his faith to his children and sees to their religious education.
  • A Catholic man informs himself about his faith, reads Scripture, select Catholic literature, and studies the Catechism of the Catholic Church.
  • A Catholic man insures that there are sacred symbols in his household, such as, a crucifix(es), Bible, use of sacramentals such as the Advent wreath, Christmas cre`che, etc.
  • A Catholic man leads prayer in his household at significant domestic events, such as, birth, Baptism, graduation, marriage, illness, death, and other special meals and events with use of a passage from Scripture or other Catholic sources.
  • A Catholic man practices presence with his wife and children.
  • A Catholic man invests himself in some project or apostolate at the parish or diocesan level.
  • A catholic man is faithful to his wife, his children, his Church and his friends, indeed all his commitments.

© Bishop Joseph N. Perry, Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago

Download a PDF copy, click here.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter each year. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: Being a Disciple of Jesus

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Alleluia Jn 14:6

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
I am the way and the truth and the life, says the Lord;
no one comes to the Father except through me.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

[14:6] The truth: in John, the divinely revealed reality of the Father manifested in the person and works of Jesus. The possession of truth confers knowledge and liberation from sin (Jn 8:32).

“Truth be told, however, Jesus doesn’t want our admiration of him. He wants our discipleship. There’s a difference. Simply, admiring Jesus Christ will not get you saved. Being a disciple of Jesus demands a conscientious, calculated, intentional and determined commitment made to Him and his counsel.”

Bishop Joseph Perry

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

When I saw this moment in time, of a plow in a garden with a chair, it reminded me of my favorite verse from the Bible. Luke 9:62 – “Jesus Said, “No one who sets a hand to the plow and looks to what was left behind is fit for the Kingdom of God”.

What this means to me is like when a farmer plows a field they must be committed to the task to reap the fruit of their labor. Likewise, Jesus in this scripture speaks of the seriousness, and the unconditional nature, of Christian Discipleship. That we must be committed to, and not distracted from, the proclaiming of the Kingdom of God, no matter how briefly.

So then looking at this picture, and the illumination from the morning sun, it’s as if the Holy Spirit is shining on this field with the plow. That there is no time to rest when it’s time to plow.

A picture with a good reminder that God is with us through our work in this world.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter each year. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and around Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: Our First Ministry

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Memorial of Saint Scholastica, virgin

Alleluia  MT 4:23

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Jesus preached the Gospel of the Kingdom
and cured every disease among the people.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

[4:2325] This summary of Jesus’ ministry concludes the narrative part of the first book of Matthew’s gospel (Mt 34). The activities of his ministry are teaching, proclaiming the gospel, and healing; cf. Mt 9:35.

The time we spend with our family should never be a second thought. It should always be our first thought. ….it is our first ministry.  As husbands and fathers Jesus said we are the priest of our homes, and as dads our job is to get our family members to heaven.

“The Christian home is the place where children receive the first proclamation of the faith. For this reason the family home is rightly called “the domestic church,” a community of grace and prayer, a school of human virtues and of Christian charity.” CCC 1666 and here.

St. Paul said: “Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ loved the church ….. this is a great mystery, but I speak in reference to Christ and the church.” Eph. 5:25-32

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

“Faith is the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen.” Hebrews 11:1

When I see this moment of hands reaching out to God in prayer, in community, it illustrates to me the outword expression of the inner faith of a community of prayers, in belief of what is hoped for.

Said another way, sometimes, when we don’t have answers or can’t provide a soulution, praying to God and trusting Him in faith has proven to do what we can not. In His time and not in ours.

God wants us to depend on Him, and Loves us to the point to provide us the freedom to make that decision.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter each year. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and beyond are invited to attend.