Love Neighbor. Love God.

Love is the only thing that can conquer hate.

Watch this video for the Gospel Daily Reflection for Saturday July 18, 2020.

God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. To become configured to be more like Jesus.

Jesus shows us that instead of cutting people down to carry out injustice, reach out to those who know their need for healing and forgiveness. Prayer should lead us to the depths of loving and serving others.

To do this, instead of taking action for justice Jesus first withdrew, as should we to address our own need for healing our own wounds.

Love is the only thing that can conquer hate, darkness, and intolerance.

hate for hate only intensifies the existence of hate and evil in the universe. . . . The strong person is the person who can cut off the chain of hate, the chain of evil. . . . and inject within the very structure of the universe that strong and powerful element of love.

Martin Luther King

Thankfully God doesn’t cancel us, He redeems us.

Responding to Change

Seeking solutions to changes and conflict in your life.

Photo: ‘Blue Chicago Blizzard‘ – Copyright 2012 Frank J Casella

All human relationships include change and conflict. The key is to learn constructive methods for reaching a resolution when change happens.

Whether it’s work or family, marriage or friendships, health matters, our culture, or the many conflicts in our war-torn world, it is more productive to tap into identifying our emotions in times of change, and then accept them – to seek God’s direction in what we are feeling – rather than bottle it up.

I share this from experience. And most of this article is what I have personally learned about, and from, change in my life. You may want to share your own experiences in the comments section below.

Dr. Gary Chapman asks “Is your personality an asset or liability to your relationships and the world around you? The Psalms show us how to express our feelings and emotions, and the Holy Spirit plays an important roll in this. While our personalities are developed in childhood, they are not set in stone. We can change.”

“The message of the Bible is that God loves us as we are”, says Chapman, “but he loves us too much to leave us as we are.” We all need to grow and growth requires change. We can be influenced by our personality, but we need not be controlled by it.

Instead, we are to be controlled by the Holy Spirit. In Ephesians 4, St. Paul tells us, to be renewed in the spirit of your minds.” When we yield to the power of the Holy Spirit significant changes in our approach to life and relationships will become evident. But the key as men is to leave it with the Holy Spirit and not take it back as soon as we feel it out of control, or the situation not going as we think it should. But most of all, don’t lose hope.

As Catholic men who are task minded, our deeper question might be where is change? Where do I want to end up? It’s not only the change but considering the thought of change. In seeking a deeper understanding, I may have to drop what I believe to accept something new.

Responding to change means to spend time in the quiet presence of the Holy Spirit, to consult the Catechism of the Catholic Church and the Bible, and learn from the magisterial teachings of the Catholic Church – which is the church’s authority or office to give authentic interpretation of the Word of God.

Responding to change does not mean to listen to what others or our culture say what’s important, without mentioning the (sources from the) Holy Spirit. The thing about (men’s) spirituality is that it cannot be measured. Thus some forms of spirituality can deceive us if we’re not tapped into the Holy Spirit seeking wisdom and direction for the truth.

In other words, I’m sure you are aware how there are people in circles of the church who share their own theology so to speak, who don’t provide the sources of church teaching from what they are saying about the Holy Spirit, meditation or contemplation, etc.. (do an internet search on them and see if there is much controversy and what is said about them). This can be compared to how a news reporter may say ‘sources tell us’ without sharing who those sources are (this no longer means what it used to) – don’t listen to them!

For example, some people I follow on Catholic Manhood are (not in any order): Matt Fradd, Bishop Thomas Olmstead, Fr. Larry Richards, Randy Hain, Sam Guzman, Brian Caulfield, Bill Dodds, Hector Molina, Patrick McCaskey, Fr. Burke Masters, Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, and of course our own Bishop Joseph Perry. Many Catholic men also follow: Dr. Gary Chapman, Dr. Charles Stanley, Dr. Tony Evans, and Dr. Meg Meeker, to name a few. You can also consult our growing Catholic Books post.

Change Begins With Me

Begin by changing your own attitude. Instead of cursing the darkness, light a candle in your own heart. Say to God “If you give me a vision of what a spiritual change in my life will look like, then I’m willing to make the changes.” Then read the Bible and other Catholic resources and look for passages that tell you what this change should be.

Think. Prepare. Action. – It happens with focus. It doesn’t happen with information, from head to heart.

Every day do something that will make you better, and ask God to help you live up to this model. The fastest way to success, is to replace bad habits with good habits. If we hear but don’t change our behavior, we’re then essentially fooling ourselves. It’s when we put God’s guidance into action that transforming change can take place.

Say to yourself: “To see changes happening in my life, it begins with me.”

There is always something left to love. And the worse things are, the more there is to love. In Christ, God has assured us of his love, his acceptance, his understanding, his peace at all times – especially when times are the dreariest and the most hopeless God asks us who would be his holy people to be as ready as God is to lift up, to forgive, to support, to love every man.

Bishop Joseph Perry

The hope is in that of having a positive attitude. Not to focus on the problem but the solution. This focus of seeking the solutions, and reaching out to others, will lead to the answers in responding to change and conflict in your life.

God give you peace.

Frank J Casella

The SALT Principle

The highest and best way to love others is to apply the SALT Principle:

See others as Jesus sees them.

Accept others as Jesus accepts them.

Love others as Jesus loves them.

Touch others as Jesus touches them.

Ike Reighard

Too often we get wrapped up in our own little world, and we’re consumed with our own needs without even noticing the needs of those around us. Or we’re so exhausted at the end of each day that we can’t imagine giving out to anyone else, especially to demanding kids or a spouse who is at least as tired as we are.

We have to break this cycle, back up, regroup, and bring some sanity to our lives so we’ll have the perspective, energy, and compassion for the people we see each day, and especially those who live under the same roof with us.

Then we can love them like we love ourselves. ….

God created us to function best when we are fully devoted to Him. When we do that, each part of our lives comes into alignment – or drops away because it’s no longer important. When we fail to put God first, everything seems equally important, and we spend all our energies trying to please people, proving ourselves, or hiding from risks. God’s first commandment demands complete devotion, and it makes perfect sense. It’s the way he created us to live.

From The One Year Daily Insights with Zig Ziglar and Dr. Ike Reighard.

Manhood Monday: The Love of God, for us, and for Humanity

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Tenth Week in Ordinary Time

Alleluia MATTHEW 5:12A

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Rejoice and be glad;
for your reward will be great in heaven.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

“There are many ways to describe Catholic manhood – faithful, honest, virtuous – but let’s start with the most basic.

A Catholic man is a man who loves. That may sound simple or trite, but only because the word “love” has been so devalued through overuse and outright misuse. ….

The words of Jesus Christ, as he contemplates the Cross, are a model of Catholic manhood, the definition of Catholic love.

The love that Jesus expresses is the love of a Father, his own heavenly Father. We all know the “John 3:16” signs held up from the stands at ball games, and we may roll our eyes at those “fundamentalists.” But what does that particular verse say?

“For God so loved the world that he sent his only Son … that the world might be saved through him.” We’re talking about the love of God the Father for us, for humanity! This is very personal, very real, the essence of our purpose and mission in life.

Jesus Christ is the perfect expression – the full embodiment – of the Father’s love, and he passes on this love to us. “This is my commandment: Love one another as I love you …” (John 15:12). …

… A Catholic man is one who is sent on the mission of love that comes through Christ from the Father.”

Brian Caulfield

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘Lakefront Vibe City of Chicago’ Copyright 2018 Frank J Casella

Jesus made our giving possible because He became our vine. If we remain in Him, we can bear fruit from Him to give to others with a servant heart. Because we have been served, we can now serve as Jesus did, and live the goodness of a Catholic man.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: The Holy Spirit Speaking to Us

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Alleluia JN 14:26

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The Holy Spirit will teach you everything
and remind you of all I told you.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Lord,

What will be the right thing for me to persue right now so that I might be and do what you desire for me to be and do?    – Amen.

Pray the above prayer and let God speak to your heart. Close your drapes and make it time with only you and the Lord. When you think you are done and it’s time to leave, that is the point when you are to stay put.  For that is the time when you have ‘drained your brain’ of worldly concerns – talking to God from your human understanding – and are ready to open your ears to listen for the prompting of the Holy Spirit speaking to us.  Give it time, and don’t rush it.

Trust in the LORD with all your heart, on your own intelligence rely not;  In all your ways be mindful of him, and he will make straight your paths. 

Proverbs 3: 5 – 6

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Dog Eyes – Copyright 2008 Frank J Casella

When you train your dog with leadership and love, he looks at you with dog eyes of trust and love back.

When you trust in the Lord, that is when God speaks to you through the prompting of the Holy Spirit.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: Covered by the Glory of God

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Second Week of Easter

Alleluia Col 3:1

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
If then you were raised with Christ,
seek what is above,
where Christ is seated at the right hand of God.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

[3:14] By retaining the message of the gospel that the risen, living Christ is the source of their salvation, the Colossians will be free from false religious evaluations of the things of the world (Col 3:12). They have died to these; but one day when Christ…appears, they will live with Christ in the presence of God (Col 3:34).

As our relationship with God unfolds and we begin to celebrate the love relationship we have with our Creator, we will lose our preoccupation with trying to score points for heaven or achieving some personal satisfaction and learn how to love and embrace all things and people as God does. We will understand that the primary task of discipleship is learning how to discern and cooperate with God’s life-giving, loving, and all unifying plan of salvation. Only a contemplative heart can love those most difficult to love and do what is most challenging and risky to do. O God, let all the nations praise you!
Rev. Mark Suslenko

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

He Has Covered Himself in Glory Copyright 2013 Frank J Casella

If Love was easy, it would not be Love.

With the Catholic Faith we often see the crucified Christ, death on the cross. With this cross, however, we see the submissive Christ, with arms stretched out.

The symbolism of both versions I think is to remind believers that it is through our suffering that we become a new person in Christ. The Church is known as an redemptive agency in the world.

Christ exampled Love though giving of self and through suffering, so that we might all live that example and be covered by the Glory of God.

All we have to do is receive it with our heart, and then live what we received and now believe.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: Trying to Become Saints

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of Holy Week

Verse Before The Gospel Jn 12:1-11

Hail to you, our King;

you alone are compassionate with our faults.

God bless “Keep in mind that our community is not composed of those who are already saints, but of those who are trying to become saints. Therefore let us be extremely patient with each other’s faults and failures.” your day.

Saint (Mother) Teresa, quoted in ‘No Greater Love’ edited by Becky Benenate and Joseph Durepos

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

A bare altar with purple banner sets the tone at Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago, Illinois, where faithful Catholics visit throughout the days for prayer and observing for Holy Week. Photo: ‘Holy Week’ Copyright 2016 Frank J Casella on Fine Art America

Growing up as the fourth of five children and the child of parents who owned a prominent business in the community, Casella Custom Draperies (later Dorothy’s Custom Draperies), I had a name to live up to. I was reminded all of my life while living at home what a Casella does and doesn’t do. People in the community would often tell my parents of their interaction with us kids, especially when my mom was measuring their windows. Because of this I have become proud to be a Casella, but more important the name that I and my family bring to Jesus Christ. For Christ and the Church was and is the foundation of our family. Below are some ways that we, as Catholic men, can live up to the virtues that Jesus modeled for us during His earthly ministry.

During this Holy Week, may we commit ourselves to living “in the name of the Lord.”

14 Ways To Becoming The Man God Calls You To Be
  1. Admit your weaknesses and limitations, while finding strength in faith and genuine love to overcome your sins and faults.
  2. Men need confession regularly. Also, ask your wife and children for forgiveness when you fail them.
  3. Learn what being a real man is all about, study and live-out the Virtues of a Catholic Man.
  4. Be leery of the demonic influences which destroys men and their homes.
  5. Be strong, without putting on a mask of false strength. Persevere and don’t quit.
  6. Focus on the right goal, live as a beloved son of God, and be a man that can become a saint.
  7. Acknowledge one’s faults and live according to the Holy Spirit. Trust in and live God’s agenda, and not in your own human understanding.
  8. Appreciate properly the differences between men and women, and how God made you to be a gift to each other.
  9. Be a man of true love and of wisdom, pursue holiness, and make a difference in the world.
  10. Be a roll model to your children, so they don’t have to look elsewhere for a mentor. Bring them to the pew on Sunday, and encourage this when they are out on their own.
  11. True manliness is not opposed to love but thrives on it, and knows the place of sexuality for the unmarried man as well as for the married man.
  12. Maintain your children’s trust by how you love their mother.  Date your daughters, example to them what to expect from a man.
  13. Catch your kids doing something right.
  14. Develop a relationship with Christ that reveals your meaning and identity as a man.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and surrounding Chicagoland are invited to attend.