Manhood Monday: Jesus Christ Has Destroyed Death

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Monday of the Third Week in Ordinary Time.

Alleluia 2 TM 1:10

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Our Savior Jesus Christ has destroyed death
and brought life to light through the Gospel.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Jesus Christ has destroyed death. This fact changes everything. Without that, religion has no power. This is a very succinct summation of the Gospels.

Redemption from sin and the call to holiness of life are not won by personal deeds but are freely and graciously bestowed according to God’s eternal plan.

“It may appear to be something of a riddle. The stamp left on us by the popular culture is a mixed experience. We are drawn to the this-worldly in all its allurements. We are made to think that all that is popular is also good precisely because it is American and free and affordable or legal. We know we can be deceived as well as our children and grandchildren can be deceived. So, we come to church for direction to put all things in proper perspective so that the road-map to the kingdom can remain for us clear and uncluttered. It is a wise man who can sort out the goodness of the world from the evil the world generates.” ~ Bishop Joseph Perry

God bless your day.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘Believe’ Copyright 2018 Frank J Casella on Fine Art Aerica

There are several ways to believe. We can believe in ourselves or someone else. We can believe in a certain way to do something. We can also believe In what others tell us.

The important thing for me is when I believe that it’s my own thinking, and not what another person wants me to beleive. Sometimes, when I do this I can feel all alone.

So, there needs to be, I have found, a source for your convictions. A measuring stick if you will. That source for me is Jesus Christ — not because we live in a Christan nation or that the majority still believes in Christianity.

Rather because the words and actions of Jesus are proven, and have impacted my life to the point of that is what I beleive. Jesus also brings us to a form of independence. …

Those who live contrary to the designs and plans of God are courting destruction and Death — not simply the death of the body, but the death of the soul.

Living in a way contrary to the purposes of our human nature made in the image of God inevitably leads to suffering and mourning. The lies we tell ourselves, and those we accept from our culture, lead to ever more complex justifications which inevitably damage our spiritual health, sending us into spirals of sin which further blind us.

Such justification with out repentance ultimately leads to destruction. It is only by loving God’s truth more than human praise that we can come to true repentance, which frees us to live in accord with God’s purposes revealed to us in Jesus Christ, the perfect image of God.

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter each year. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and beyond are invited to attend.

Manhood Monday: A Change of Heart

Your weekly dose of “Living the Goodness of a Catholic Man”.

From Today’s Readings:

Alleluia  Mk 1:15

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The Kingdom of God is at hand;
repent and believe in the Gospel.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

With repent, John the Baptist calls for a change of heart and conduct, a turning of one’s life from rebellion to obedience towards the gospel of God: not only the good news from God but about God at work in Jesus Christ.

Repent, yes.

Believe, yes.

But a different kind of obedience; rather Jesus invites by saying, follow me. He wants us to want to do it, his will, not ours; out of love

It is not only important for us to repent and believe, but then to be ambassadors of the faith through our actions, of God’s promises. All true repentance begins in the heart, and only God can give us a new heart.

God bless your week.

The CMCS-Team


Frank’s Photo of the Week

Photo: ‘At the Heart of Everything’ Copyright 2015 Frank J Casella on Fine Art America
Catholic Archbishop of Chicago, Cardinal Blase Cupich, makes time for Holy Adoration before Mass at Infant Jesus of Prague Parish in the Archdiocese of Chicago.
Draw Near to God

God is love, and invites us to draw near to Him. So that we can be illuminated with His Light, and allow Him to remove the fog we often have with finding our purpose.

“Draw near to God, and he will draw near to you. Cleanse your hands, you sinners, and purify your hearts, you of two minds.”

James 4:8

Thanks for Reading.

Make it a great week. See you back here again next Monday.

Frank J Casella,
CMCS Executive Director

A larger collection of photographs can be viewed on my portfolio.


Not signed up yet? Click here.

Click here to learn about the annual Bishop Perry’s Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum held on the Saturday after Easter each year. All men from around the Archdiocese of Chicago and beyond are invited to attend.

Taking it all in stride

God’s will is that we depend on Him.

Taking things in your stride means, as you go along the bumpy road of life, which most people will inevitably experience, you endeavor not to let the more challenging events you encounter blow you off course.

Much of the strength I get to take things in stride is through my faith and relationship with Jesus Christ. Just because I am a Christian doesn’t mean I don’t have problems. In fact, I probably have more. Because people it seems test you to see the power of your belief.

Anger, worry, struggles and the like are revelations that things are not going our way, and that we are not in control of everything. When I take things in stride, and wait on God and meet Him where He is at work (in my life), it’s always amazing how things unfold and come together in ways that I could never do myself.

Try it. Pray for your circumstances. Ask God to show you what to do. Wait for the answer. Don’t take it back … just wait … in HIS time not yours. You will see.

God’s will is that we depend on Him. So keep it all in perspective and take in all in stride.

Frank J Casella

Holy Week Message from Bishop Joseph Perry

A Blessed Holy Week and Easter to all our readers and participants with our Men’s Prayer Groups and Conferences, from Catholic Men Chicago Southland.

Bishop Joseph Perry

We walk with the Lord this week in his suffering and keep vigil with him for his resurrection. The grace and merit given the death and resurrection of Jesus is communicated to us in our Baptism. We consciously absorb these mysteries and their graces by our participation in the Church’s liturgies this Holy Week: Palm Sunday the Lord’s entrance into the city of Jerusalem; the commemoration of his Last Supper and arrest on Holy Thursday; his death and burial on Good Friday; the Holy Saturday Vigil where we move with some powerful scripture passages from darkness to light, receive new converts to Catholic faith and fellowship, renew our baptismal vows and celebrate the resurrection. Come the feast of the Resurrection next Sunday, Christians climb to the rooftops to shout out to the world, again, the greatest piece of news ever, namely, that our God in Jesus in alive, when evil men meant him dead and the life he now has is promised all of us who believe in him while we await His return to take us with him.

It helps not to skip to Easter Sunday unless we have walked with the Lord through his passion. We can’t experience Easter appropriate without having gone through Good Friday. This remains a metaphor for all our experiences of life. I think of it this way:

  • If someone we loved died tragically and we were not there with them, our affection for that person would drive us to want to know every detail every minute, every second of their passion and death. We would want to walk their path, rehearse each step, each place that led up to that loved one’s death, as if to be with that person vicariously when we could not be there with him or her when it happened.
  • We have heard of people traveling to Normandy, Viet Nam, Iraq, Afghanistan, even the rough streets of the city for just this purpose. “I want to know!” “I need to know how it happened and why…” we say. It is the same with Jesus. Our love and admiration for our Savior leads us to rehearse the significant steps of his passion and the loss of his life for we could not be there yet we know what happened has impact on us.

Holy Week contains special days for our walk with the Lord. Consult your parish Holy Week schedule for the times of services. Take your spouse and children with you so that the graces of this holy season can embrace you and your loved ones.

~ Bishop Joseph N. Perry

PS. All men from the Archdiocese and Chicagoland are invited to join us on the Saturday after Easter for Catholic Chicago Men’s Forum.